Image

Wild Berries

A taste of summer . . .

We are fortunate to live in an area that has various wild berries growing from early spring to late summer.  

Salmonberry Flower

Salmon Berry Flower

The first to arrive in spring are Salmon Berries that grow on prickly, six or seven foot raspberry-like canes.  They are quite invasive and will move into any clear, sunny spot.  We are always glad to see the flowers because they are a favourite of hummingbirds so once the Salmon Berry blooms, we know the hummingbirds will soon follow.

Salmon Berry

Salmon Berry

The fruit is sweet but watery and somewhat flavourless.  Still, nice to snack on and being the first berry of the season, the bears love them.  I’ll go out in the morning and there will be broken bushes around the yard and up the road from grazing bears.  The berries are not good for cooking or jamming.

Thimble Berry

Thimble Berry

Thimble Berries are not far behind the Salmon Berries.  These are not very good eating as they are dry and pulpy but again, a favourite of the bears.  The young shoots can be peeled and the pith center makes a crisp snack. 

Thimble Berry

Thimble Berry

Huckleberry

Huckleberry

Huckleberries grow on shrubs that reach about seven feet high.  You will find them in sunny spots in the forest.  We have moved quite a few plants onto our lawn (moss) area and they thrive in the full sun.  Their fruit is pea sized, sweet and juicy.  They are quite good in pies and jam but are usually mixed with other fruit to give them some flavour.  Another favourite for the bears and birds. 

Oregon Grape

Oregon Grape

Oregon Grape grow on low shrubs that have hard, shiny and serrated leaves.  They are found throughout our forest, mainly in semi- shaded areas.  They can become a ground cover in larger areas.

Oregon Grape

Oregon Grape

 The grapes are peas sized and if they get enough moisture are quite plump and tasty.  They make a nice jam but the fruit isn’t always plentiful.

Bramble Berry

Bramble Berry

Bramble Berries grow low to the ground on thin, prickly vines.  Even though they are small, the ripe black berries provide quite a punch of flavour.  In the heat of the summer and if enough of them are growing, you can smell the sweet berries in the air – one of those comfort smells.  Fairly invasive but because they are so small they are fairly easy to deal with.

Bramble Berry

Bramble Berry

Blackberry

Blackberry

The ‘prize’ of all the wild berries has to be the Blackberry.  They grow on long, thick and thorny vines that can take over any open, sunny spot.  Extremely invasive if not kept in check.

Blackberry

Blackberry

We have clumps of Blackberry vines throughout our acreage and the ripened berries are the highlight of our fall season.  The berries are abundant and we fill the freezer for jam and jelly making at a later date.  Blackberry pies are incredible and Blackberry wine is delicious!  We make a cordial with just boiling water and honey and it will keep all winter.  Another late season snack for the bears and they will gorge on them in order to put on some fat for winter.


13 comments

  1. We have blackberries and wineberries here in Virginia, but the birds, deer, and other animals eat them all just as they get ripe. Last year, we didn’t get one ripe berry. We did the year before, so hopefully, this year, there will be so many berries the animals can’t eat them all.

    • Fortunately, our blackberries and huckleberries are so abundant that there is always enough for everyone. Can’t say the same for our domestic fruit and nuts though. The squirrels and Stellar Jays work as a team on the hazelnuts and can strip our trees. Just have to grin and bear it sometimes.

  2. First of all, thanks for visiting my pictures every day. Second, I grew up in Humboldt County, California, and all of the berries you get, grow there. I remember as a kid rambling through the redwoods scarfing down handfuls of huckleberries, and posting a guard on the salmon berries. My mouth is watering just thinking about it.

    Thanks again.

    • You are welcome RE: my visits – it is definitely my pleasure to see your daily offerings. An interesting, diverse selection of photos. The bees are working on the huckleberry and salmonberry flowers as I write so it shouldn’t be too long. Humboldt County a beautiful area. We’ve driven down the coast numerous times and have enjoyed that area. The Samoa Cook House a good memory and also the wonderful scenery.

  3. Did you notice your first photo is the same as mine today? Funny! So, the blackberries – Himalayan? I hope not! I’m still new here, so I don’t know how far they’ve ranged, but they sure are bad down here around Seattle. This post is really very well done – straightforward, clear, and so pretty!

    • Hi Lynn – yes I did notice your photo – great minds… I guess! These are definitely Himalayan blackberries and they are considered a highly invasive plant in BC and I imagine most of the West Coast, down to Oregon. They aren’t native to North America and were brought over from Eurasia but I don’t know when. They are very wide spread in our area but I’m not sure they are a problem because they growing mainly in undeveloped areas. They may be nasty but you can’t beat the abundant, free berries! Thanks for your comments about the post.

  4. I know, they’re terrible – but I agree, they sure do produce! It’s amazing how many just go uneaten, and gradually dry up on the vine here. I see that everywhere. It’s that PNW abundance – plants here sometimes seem to be on steroids compared to back east.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.