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The Gate

I took a few pictures of an intriguing gate that I saw in Nova Scotia in 2006 and always wanted to make one so this past Summer I gave it a go.  It was a great project and it is a wonderful gate.

Gate 09_watermarked

The 23 foot (7 metre) upper crossbar hinges on a piece of iron rod on the top of the 55 inch (140 cm) post closest to the camera. The other end rests on the post near the tractor.

Peeling the uprights

Peeling the log uprights

Gate 03_watermarked

Peeled 4 foot (1.2 metre) uprights

Gate 12_watermarked

Shaping the uprights

Upright inserted through 1.5" drilled hole and pinned with a dowel

Upright inserted through 2 inch (5 cm) drilled hole and pinned with a dowel

Pinned upright

Pinned upright

Three uprights in place

Three uprights in place

3.5 inch (8.9 cm) hole drilled in upright for lower 16 foot (4.9 metre) crosspiece

3.5 inch (8.9 cm) ) hole drilled in upright for lower 16 foot (4.9 metre) crosspiece

Lower crosspiece in place

Lower crosspiece in place but not trimmed to length

Middle crosspiece in place

Middle crosspiece in place

Counterweight chained to the end of the top crosspiece.  This was an old cast iron stove that we had carried around for years.

Counterweight chained to the end of the top crosspiece. This was an old cast iron
stove that we had carried around for years.

The gate with the counterweight

The gate with the counterweight which is balanced on the post.  The old stove is full of old metal logging parts I found in the woods and weighs about 300 pounds (137 kilos).  The gate portion to the left of the post weighs the same.

The upright post is capped with an old cast iron stove trivet we found somewhere.  The only place the crosspiece touches the upright is on the curved metal band.  I put a little grease where the two metals make contact.  The fences is so well balance that the whole thing cna be easily open and closed with one finger.  It feels like it is floating.  The metal gear is another pied of loggin metal an is sitting over the metal hinge rod - purely ornamental.

The upright post is capped with an old cast iron stove trivet we found somewhere. The only place the crosspiece touches the upright is on the curved metal band. I put a little grease where the two metals make contact. The fences is so well balance that the whole thing can be easily opened and closed with one finger. It feels like it is floating. The metal gear is another piece of logging remnant and is sitting over the metal hinge rod – purely ornamental.


6 comments

    • Thanks. It was quite a bit of work, peeling the logs is always tedious, but it is now a maintenance free gate (for a few years anyway). The only thing that affects it now is the rain. When the gate is wet the weight of the water makes it sag about 1/2″ from normal.

  1. Water is the bane of may outdoor projects. I am really impressed with your gate – it is functional and artistic at the same time. I love it when I find a way to use things that others have discarded because they no longer see it as useful or of having any value. Job well done!

  2. Thanks for the comment Jo Ann. The water in this case just means that I need two fingers to open the gate rather than one. Yes, this project managed to use quite a few of our ‘collectibles’ and it somehow makes it all the more satisfying.


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